Campus Resources

Campus Resources

Procedures to Become Eligible for Service

If you are a new student to SPSCC and/or to DSS, you will need to make an appointment for an intake interview with the Coordinator of DSS. You will also need to provide documentation of disability that meets SPSCC guidelines. Accommodations and the student's need for accommodations are determined on a case by case basis.

It is the student's responsibility to meet with instructors at the onset of the quarter to discuss accommodations. If the student is concerned about meeting with an instructor, the Coordinator of DSS will meet with both the student and instructor to facilitate a discussion of the accommodations.

Timeline to Obtain Services

Although a qualified student who submits acceptable documentation of his/her disability is eligible for accommodations at any point in a given quarter once the intake interview has been completed, some accommodations (e.g. interpreting services, text in alternative format [Braille, e-text], textbooks on audiotape, enlarged print, etc) require substantial advanced notice (15 to 30 working days or more).

Therefore, it is the responsibility of the prospective or enrolled student to give sufficient early notice of such accommodation to DSS each quarter the student is enrolled in order to ensure timely coordination and availability of equipment, items, and/or services.

A good time to begin planning for accommodations for an academic quarter is early in the registration period for the quarter.

Procedures to Obtain Services Once Found Eligible

Every quarter a student is requesting academic accommodations from DSS, s/he needs to stop by the Disability Support Services office in Student Life and complete a Letter of Accommodation (LOA) Request Form and attach a copy of his/her class schedule. In turn, DSS will provide Letters of Accommodation for the student to give to each of his/her instructors. These letters indicate which accommodations the student has qualified for and are intended to begin communication between the student and his/her instructor. Accommodations rely on a collaborative partnership between DSS, the student with the disability, and the instructor.

It is the student's responsibility to meet with instructors at the onset of the quarter to discuss accommodations. If the student is concerned about meeting with an instructor, the Coordinator of DSS will meet with both the student and instructor to facilitate a discussion of the accommodations.

Please click here for more information about how college is different than high school.

Online Resources

Required Documentation to Become Eligible for Disability Support Services

Documentation of a disability must be generated by a medical or professional expert in the related field of disability and submitted in writing to Disability Support Services where it will be kept in a separate, confidential file. (Note: The cost and responsibility for providing this documentation shall be borne by the student.)

The documentation should be current and include a description of the disability, names and results of tests administered (if appropriate), and a statement of how the disability impacts the student in an educational setting.

Disability Category:
Professional Diagnostician(s) to be Consulted (not limited to):
Psychologist, Psychiatrist, Physician
Psychologist, Psychiatrist
Ophthalmologist
Certified Otologist, Audiologist
Psychologist, Neuropsychologist, School Psychologist
Physician, Nurse Practitioner


For Learning Disabilities, the following guidelines are appropriate:

  • BOTH an IQ Test and an Achievement Test; administered at the adult learning level (within the last 3 to 4 years).
  • For the IQ test, the WAIS-III is preferred (in lieu of a WAIS III, a WAIS-R or two WISC-III tests that are correlated within 15 IQ points of each other may be acceptable.)
  • For the Achievement Test portion, the Woodcock Johnson or Woodcock Johnson-R is the most commonly used. (The WRAT-R and the WRAT-III tests are not comprehensive measures of achievement and therefore are not appropriate for documentation.)
  • Exact instruments used, test results (including subtest score data), written interpretation of the results, name, title, and professional credentials of the evaluator, and the dates of the testing.
  • Clear and specific evidence which identifies specific learning disabilities and reflects the individual's present level of adult functioning in processing and intelligence, as well as achievement.

The College does not provide diagnostic testing for learning disabilities. The DSS office can provide you a list of LD evaluators and diagnosticians; however, we do not make any recommendations or referrals to any one specific person or company.

PLEASE NOTE: IEP's or ITP's, and 504 Plans DO NOT meet documentation requirements, but may be included as part of a more comprehensive assessment battery as described in this document. Additionally, individual "learning styles", "learning differences", "learning problems" and "academic problems" in-and-of themselves do not constitute a learning disability. Please click here for more information how college is different from high school.

If there should be any questions regarding appropriate documentation, please contact DSS at: (360) 596-5455.

Contact

Disability Support Services
Student Life: Building 27
Second Floor

Appointments:
(360) 596-5306


Information:
(360) 596-5394


Assistant Director
of Diversity and Equity:
John Rajcich
(360) 596-5306

Director of Diversity and Equity:
Eileen Yoshina
(360) 596-5383


Documentation

DSS Exam Form (pdf)
Procedures and Complaint Process (pdf)